Home 4 Provost Seminar Series 4 Event Info
Updated November 16, 2007
 
 

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OCTOBER 30, 2007 Event

Penn Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar
STRESS & INJURY: Integrating Environment, Biology and Behavior
Tuesday, October 30, 2007 from 1:30 to 3:30 pm Terrace Room (Logan Hall), University of Pennsylvania

 
 

Adrian Raine, PhD
Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor, University of Pennsylania
Biosocial Risk Factors for Violence and Intervention Implications

Podcast coming soon!

     

JANUARY 26, 2007 Event

Penn Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar
STRESS & INJURY: Integrating Environment, Biology and Behavior
Friday, January 26, 2007 from 1:30 to 3:30 pm Terrace Room (Logan Hall), University of Pennsylvania

 

 

 

Andrew Newberg, MD
Associate Professor of Radiology, Psychiatry, and Religious Studies; Director of the Center for Spirituality and the Mind
University of Pennsylvania

click on the title to listen to a podcast
The Neuropsychological Correlates of Forgiveness

 

 

 

Lawrence W. Sherman, PhD
Director, Jerry Lee Center of Criminology,
Department of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania
Heather Strang, PhD

Director, Centre of Restorative Justice,
Australian National University
Visit
ing Fellow, Jerry Lee Center of Criminology

click on the title to listen to a podcast
The Effects of Face-to-Face Restorative Justice on Victims of Crime in Four Randomized Controlled Trials

 
 

APRIL 10, 2006 Event

Penn Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar
STRESS, ILLNESS & INJURY: Integrating Environment, Biology and Behavior
Monday, April 10, 2006 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM Flyers/76ers Surgery Theatre, HUP

 

 

Deborah Prothrow-Stith, MD
Professor of Public Health and Associate Dean for Faculty Development
Department of Health Policy and Management
Harvard University
Homicide Survivors: A Clinical Approach to Assessment and Intervention

 

View pictures from the April 10th Event

 
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DECEMBER 9, 2005 Event

Penn Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar
STRESS, ILLNESS & INJURY: Integrating Environment, Biology and Behavior
Friday, December 9, 2005 from 12:00 to 1:30 pm Colonial Penn Center Auditorium , Univ of Pennsylvania

 
  Gary Evans , PhD
Professor, Department of Design and Environmental Analysis
Cornell University
Environmental Stress: The Role of the Physcial Environment in Psychological Well Being
 
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APRIL 19, 2005 Event

Penn Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar
STRESS, ILLNESS & INJURY: Integrating Environment, Biology and Behavior
Tuesday, April 19, 2005 from 1:00 to 4:00 pm Terrace Room (Logan Hall), University of Pennsylvania

 
  Peter Sterling, PhD
Professor, Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania
Allostasis: predictive regulation and rational therapeutics
 
  Bruce McEwen, PhD
Professor and Head of the Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Rockefeller University
Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators: allostasis and allostatic load
 

Introduction by Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP

 

Why are the new concepts of allostasis and allostatic load important for researchers and relevant to research in public health?  At FICAP, much of our area of interest in injury and violence spans biology, behavior and environment. Integrating the complexity of these concepts in injury science is challenging. As we looked at the new directions in research on stress and chronic diseases, it struck us that these same mechanisms might be relevant to intentional and unintentional injuries, as well.   Drs. Sterling and McEwen originated the concepts and produced the seminal work in allostasis and allostatic load respectively.  These concepts are necessary to understand stress and illness. Lay use of the word "stress" does not translate well into science and its meaning varies across disciplines.  Our speakers will explain the concepts of allostasis and allostatic load and why they are significant.  We are delighted that they are willing to join us in exploring how these concepts might inform new directions in injury research.

 
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Allostasis: predictive regulation and rational therapeutics
Peter Sterling, PhD

 

Homeostasis, the standard model in physiology and medicine, states that each key parameter is clamped to a "setpoint" with acute deviations corrected by negative feedback. This model implies that chronic deviations reflect broken mechanisms and suggests therapies to restore "inappropriate" values to "normal".

Evidence now accumulates against this model: (i) parameters actually vary; (ii) variations do not signify error but, rather, the brain's effort to prevent error; (iii) homeostasis cannot explain prevalent diseases, such as essential hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and addictions where mechanisms are not broken, and where drug treatments directed at low-level mechanisms are ineffective. Allostasis, a new model, emphasizes that the goal of regulation is not constancy, but efficiency, which requires preventing errors and minimizing costs. Both needs are best accomplished when the brain uses prior information to predict demand and then adjusts all parameters to anticipate it. Allostasis treats unusual parameter values, not as failures to defend setpoint, but rather as responses to some prediction. The model attributes essential hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and addictions to sustained neural signals that arise from unsatisfactory social interactions. Consequently allostasis would redirect therapy, away from manipulating low-level mechanisms, toward improving higher levels with the goal of restoring predictive fluctuation - which is the hallmark of health.

 
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Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators: allostasis and allostatic load l Bruce McEwen, PhD

 

Stress, whether dramatic or a series of events in daily life, exacts a toll by elevating the activities of the mind and body's physiological systems, causing wear and tear on the brain and many body systems.  This wear and tear is called allostatic load. It reflects the impact of how negative life events, genetic factors, individual behaviors, and developmental experiences shape life long patterns of reactivity by the systems that produce physiological stress mediators. While the neuroendrocrine hormones associated with stress and allostatic load are adaptive and protect the body in the short run, changes in the long run increase mortality and disease, particularly for those coping with a lifetime of limited resources and negative life events.  The allostatic load that results from psychosocial challenges related to competition in social hierarchies has been found to promote poor health and chronic disease.  Its impact on cognitive function and behavioral adaptations may also affect risk-taking and promote self-injurious behaviors as well as hostility and aggression.

 
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