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2014 News Archives

August 20, 2014
Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD, addiction psychiatrist and founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction, talks about the importance of treating alcoholism and depression simultaneously in an article from the Huffington Post.
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August 19, 2014
In continuing coverage, NBCNews.com reports on a Penn study, co-authored by Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, showing that doctors may be missing depression in early stage Parkinson’s patients. The study was also covered by the BBC, the Washington Post and WHYY Radio.
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August 19, 2014
Cory Newman, PhD, director of the Center for Cognitive Therapy, spoke with Philly.com about suicide prevention and the importance of seeking professional help.
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August 18, 2014
New Penn Medicine research, led by Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. Dr. Weintraub also explained the connection between Parkinson's disease and depression in the Philadelphia Inquirer's blog, The Public's Health.
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August 15, 2014
Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of psychiatry, spoke with NBCNews.com about the relationship between Parkinson's Disease and depression.
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August 14, 2014
Medical Student Edward Larkin and assistant professor of Psychiatry Irene Hurford, MD, share the story of a recent patient struggling with schizophrenia, in a New York Times op-ed.
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August 14, 2014
Antidepressant therapy alone appears to correlate with a risk of mania in bipolar patients, while no risk of mania was seen in patients on antidepressants along with mood stabilizers, according to new research, led by Michael Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry.
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August 13, 2014
Led by Daniel Weintraub, MD, a Perelman School of Medicine team found that Naltrexone may be instrumental in taming impulse-control disorders in Parkinson’s patients.
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August 12, 2014
In an article about Philadelphia Chef Michael Solomonov's problems with addiction, Henry Kranzler, MD, professor of Psychiatry and director of the Center for Studies of Addiction, told the Philadelphia Inquirer, "It's not uncommon for people to use drugs both during times of great tragedy and great success ... as an adaptation to stress."
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August 8, 2014
Tracy Bale, PhD, associate professor of Neuroscience, spoke with The Scientist about research suggesting that the history of a grandmother’s stressful environment during pregnancy can be passed on to her grandchildren.
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August 5, 2014
The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Montgomery County Blog featured ARTZ Philadelphia, a branch of the national organization, ARTZ: Artists for Alzheimer’s, which creates arts programming for people with Alzheimer’s disease that incorporates caregiver participation. Anjan Chatterjee, MD, chair of Neurology at Pennsylvania Hospital, who is conducting research with ARTZ Philadelphia, and the Penn Memory Center are featured.
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August 5, 2014
A research team lead by John Detre, MD, a professor of neurology, Daniel Licht, MD, an associate professor of neurology, and Arjun Yodh, PhD, a professor in Department of Physics & Astronomy, are working to develop a device that can continuously monitor blood flow in the brain.
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July 29, 2014
A team of researchers from Penn, including Brian Litt, MD, professor of Neurology, and the Mayo Clinic has challenged the best minds in science and “machine learning” to improve devices to treat epilepsy with two competitions to detect and predict seizure onset.
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July 28, 2014
Friday’s Pulse on WHYY featured the work of Maria Geffin, PhD, assistant professor in the department of Otorhinolaryngolgy: Head and Neck Surgery, who studies speech comprehension and how the brain assigns meaning to sound.
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July 28, 2014
Akiva S. Cohen, PhD
has received a MERIT award from the National Institutes of Health for work on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathologies caused by head injuries.
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July 28, 2014
Anjan Chatterjee, MD, associate professor of Neurology, spoke with Live Science about a study suggesting that people with Parkinson's disease may have higher levels of creativity than their healthy peers.
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July 22, 2014
South Jersey Times reporter Bob Shryock shares with readers his story of undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS), performed by Gordon Baltuch, MD, PhD, a professor of Neurosurgery, for his Parkinson’s disease and the surgical procedure he’s had every three years since to replace the stimulator’s battery.
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July 22, 2014
Penn Medicine researchers, including Gerald Schellenberg, PhD, professor in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, are conducting studies that attracted multi-million dollar grants this month, reports the Philadelphia Business Journal.
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July 21, 2014
Psychiatric News covered recent research by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology, and Neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress, showing that antidepressants have lowered levels of beta-amyloid in laboratory animals and some human volunteers.
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July 14, 2014
The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on this weekend’s passing of professor emeritus of Psychiatry and renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, Albert J. Stunkard, MD, at the age of 92.
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July 11, 2014
A team of scientists and physicians at the University of Pennsylvania, including Gordon Baltuch, MD, PhD, Kathryn Davis, MD, MSTR, Timothy Lucas, MD, PhD, and Joel Stein, MD, PhD, will lead a four-year effort worth as much as $22.5 million to develop next-generation technologies to restore memory function in people who suffer from memory loss due to disease or traumatic injury. The Philadelphia Inquirer, the New York Times, WHYY Newsworks, and CBS3 also covered this story.
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July 7, 2014
Neurologists at Penn Medicine are mentioned in a story on CBS 3 for their work to better understand the neurodegenerative disease, ALS, and to help slow its progression.
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July 3, 2014
An article from SAMHSA.gov, the web site for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, profiles the unique services and approach taken by faculty and staff at the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness (PCWBW).
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June 30, 2014
For those who are addicted, there are new strategies to beat alcoholism, Charles O'Brien, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and founding director of the Center for Studies in Addiction, told NBCNews.com.
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July 2, 2014
Jayne Wilkinson, MD, associate clinical director, Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, is quoted in a Good Days from CDF article about how telemedicine is revolutionizing care for Parkinson's patients.
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June 24, 2014
Charles O'Brien, MD, psychiatry professor and founding director of the Center for Treatment and Studies of Addiction, was recently interviewed by the PBS radio program, The People's Pharmacy, on the latest advances in addiction treatment.
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June 24, 2014
Alzforum features research from the lab of Virginia M.Y. Lee, PhD, professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research. In another step forward for passive immunotherapy, they have shown that antibodies to α-synuclein can rescue neurons and improve symptoms in a mouse model of sporadic Parkinson’s disease.
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June 23, 2014
Neurology Today reports on research led by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology, suggesting that the commonly used antidepressant Celexa, and perhaps other drugs in its class, may temporarily lower levels of a protein that clogs the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
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June 16, 2014
In continuing coverage, David Mandell, ScD, director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research at Penn, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer story on his recent research showing that the average lifetime cost of supporting someone with autism in the United States is $1.4 million and for those with autism and an intellectual disability or cognitive impairment, the expense rises to $2.4 million.
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June 13, 2014
The HHMI Bulletin, from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, covers the research of HHMI investigator Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, in a feature article on chronobiology.
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June 13, 2014
Using powerful, newly developed cell culture and mouse models of sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD), a team of researchers, including senior author Virginia M.Y. Lee, PhD, has demonstrated that immunotherapy with specifically targeted antibodies may block the development and spread of PD pathology in the brain.
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June 12, 2014
Costs for a lifetime of support for each individual with autism spectrum disorder may reach $2.4 million, according to a new study from researchers, including David Mandell, ScD, director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research. This research was covered by the Associated Press, USA Today, the Huffington Post, HealthDay News, Bloomberg News, Reuters, Time, Kaiser Health News, LiveScience, Newsworks/WHYY radio and Healthline.com.
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June 10, 2014
Gerard Schellenberg, PhD, professor in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, was mentioned in a Wall Street Journal article about genome sequencing.
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June 9, 2014
Murray Grossman, MD, director of the Penn FTD Center, Lauren Elman, MD, associate medical director of Penn’s ALS Association Center, and John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, codirector of Penn's Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, were mentioned in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), a form of dementia which makes it difficult to control comments and actions.
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June 6, 2014
Martha J. Farah, PhD, director of the Center for Neuroscience and Society, was featured in an episode of the Science Channel's "Through the Wormhole," about the physical differences in the brains of rich versus poor children.
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June 4, 2014
WHYY Newsworks
reports, researchers at Penn and CHOP, led by Theodore D. Satterthwaite, MD, MA, have found that the amount of blood flow to the brain changes in adolescence -- but in different ways for girls and boys. This was also covered by the Daily Mail, Science 2.0, and the German publication, Der Spiegel.
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June 4, 2014
A small study, conducted at Penn and 15 other centers, of the female hormone estriol has found it not only reduced the immune attacks of multiple sclerosis in women, but also improved their performance on mental tests - a benefit never demonstrated by the 10 approved MS drugs, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer.
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May 30, 2014
Douglas Smith, MD
, professor of Neurosurgery and director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair, spoke with NBC News about the host of initiatives President Obama announced, designed to expand our understanding of concussions.
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May 27, 2014
Yvette Sheline, MD, a professor of Psychiatry, Radiology, and Neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress, has discovered that the common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram arrested the growth of amyloid beta, a peptide in the brain that clusters in plaques that are thought to trigger the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).
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May 27, 2014
Theodore D. Satterthwaite, MD, MA
, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, was the lead author of a new study providing evidence that cerebral blood flow (CBF) levels decreased similarly in males and females before puberty, but diverged sharply in puberty, with levels increasing in females while decreasing further in males.
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May 20, 2014
Neil Malhotra, MD, assistant professor of Neurosurgery, tells CBS3 about a patient stabbed with a knife in the back, in the spinal cord, and the risky procedure required to remove the knife.
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May 19, 2014
The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine, led by C. Neill Epperson, MD, which shows preliminary evidence that the psychostimulant drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX) can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, working memory and recall.
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May 15, 2014
Preliminary research led by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology, suggests that the commonly used antidepressant Celexa, and perhaps other drugs in its class, may temporarily lower levels of a protein that clogs the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. This research was covered by the Associated Press, HealthDay News, Yahoo! Health, Voice of America, BBC, The Scientist and WHYY radio.
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May 14, 2014
Edna Foa, PhD, director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, is mentioned in the New Yorker's recent story: "Partial Recall: Can Neuroscience Help Us Rewrite our Most Traumatic Memories".
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May 14, 2014
Douglas Smith, MD was interviewed in an NBC News story reporting that visits to emergency rooms for traumatic brain injuries — most of them concussions — jumped a whopping 29 percent in just four years, according to new research that suggests a growing awareness of the seriousness of these injuries.
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May 13, 2014
Michael Mullen, MD, assistant professor of Neurology, speaks with NBC10 about recognizing stroke symptoms using the FAST acronym - looking for Face weakness, Arm mobility, slurred Speech, and if these symptoms are present, Time to call 911 to get to the nearest hospital.
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May 12, 2014
Anjan Chatterjee, MD
, professor of Neurology, writes in The Scientist about what in the brain triggers aesthetic experiences.
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May 8, 2014
The Daily Beast reports on research by C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, which shows that the drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX)—the third-most popular ADHD medication, can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, and memory.
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May 7, 2014
C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, commented in an OB GYN News report discussing findings from a new study showing that women who experience stillbirth or infant death have extraordinarily high rates of depression and anxiety.
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May 6, 2014
The Neurodegenerative Disease lab at Penn Medicine was visited by Senator Pat Toomey, CBS3 reports. John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, Director of the Institute on Aging at Penn, spoke about how understanding how Alzheimer’s progresses paves the way for targeted therapies.
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May 6, 2014
Anthony Rostain, MD, MA, professor of Psychiatry, spoke with Medscape Medical News about research showing that an extended-release formula of metadoxine improved attention in adults with predominantly inattentive attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (PI-ADHD) after a single dose in a phase 2b study.
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May 5, 2014
A new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine, led by C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, shows preliminary evidence that the psychostimulant drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX) can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, working memory and recall.
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May 5, 2014
Michael Ascher, MD, a clinical associate professor of Psychiatry in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, is quoted in a Penn Medicine news release about research showing that people suffering from vision loss are twice as likely to suffer from depression as the general population.
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May 2, 2014
Tau protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may help distinguish amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) from other disorders with similar clinical presentations, according a study by Corey McMillan, PhD, assistant professor of Neurology, Leslie Shaw, PhD, and John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, both professors in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and colleagues.
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May 1, 2014
Michael Baime, MD, director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness and Tracy Bale, PhD, professor of Neuroscience in Psychiatry, were interviewed in Philadelphia magazine's May issue examining stress.
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May 1, 2014
WHYY Radio
and Newsworks.org report on a new smartphone app developed by Claude Nguyen, MD, associate professor of Neurology with Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, to improve efficiency in providing acute stroke care.
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April 30, 2014
FoxNews.com
reports on a new Penn Medicine study that found a link between type 2 diabetes and loss of brain matter—suggesting brain atrophy. Reporting in the journal Radiology, lead author R. Nick Bryan, MD, PhD, an emeritus professor of Radiology, and the team found that for every 10 years diabetics have the disease, their brain looked two years older than their peers without diabetes. The study was also covered by The Week, Daily Mail, and Tech Times.
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April 30, 2014
Science
magazine’s Editors’ Choice section highlights a Molecular Psychiatry paper byAmita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, about a new study in a mutant fruitfly called sleepless, which confirms that the enzyme GABA transaminase -- the target of some epilepsy drugs -- contributes to sleep loss.
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April 29, 2014
TIME and CNN report, people with type 2 diabetes may lose more brain volume than is expected as they age, according to a new study in the journal Radiology from researchers at Penn Medicine, lead by R. Nick Bryan, MD, PhD.
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April 29, 2014
Clyde Markowitz, MD, associate professor of Neurology who runs the University of Pennsylvania's multiple sclerosis program, spoke about his reservations regarding the side effects and long term consequences of medical marijuana for use in neurological disorders.
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April 29, 2014
NBCNews.com reports that people with more education recover better from traumatic brain injuries. The findings confirm what brain injury specialists have suspected, said Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery and director of Penn's Center for Brain Injury and Repair.
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April 28, 2014
Two related studies published online in the journal SLEEP, in advance of print editions, from Julie A. Williams, PhD. research associate, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology and postdoctoral fellow Tzu-Hsing Kuo, PhD, directly examine the effects of sleep on recovery from and survival after an infection.
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April 28, 2014
Amita Sehgal, PhD
, professor of Neuroscience, was quoted in the Philadelphia Weekly about the importance of sleep.
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April 28, 2014
A trio of studies from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate new approaches to understanding, treating and potentially staving off Parkinson's disease (PD).
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April 28, 2014
Stroke researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are unveiling a map demonstrating geographic hotspots of increased stroke mortality across the United States at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting.
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April 25, 2014
Amita Sehgal, PhD
, a professor of Neuroscience at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, describes in Cell a circuit in the brain of fruit flies that controls their daily, rhythmic behavior of rest and activity.
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April 25, 2014
Roy Hamilton, MD, MS, assistant professor of Neurology, is quoted in a May Wired magazine story about homemade transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices.
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April 22, 2014
The Doctors
television show highlights the signs and symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia, and shows endoscopic microvascular decompression surgical footage provided by John Y.K. Lee, MD, assistant professor of Neurosurgery.
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April 21, 2014
A study, published in Science by Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, and Matthew Kayser, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, links sleep disruption in newborn fruit flies with courtship and mating in adult flies. Coverage also appeared in The Why Files, Die Welt, Science News and Medical Daily.
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April 17, 2014
Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry, director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery and co-chair of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s Disaster and Trauma Committee, was interviewed by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette in an article discussing follow up after school tragedies occur.
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April 16, 2014
With new funding, research teams led by Penn Medicine’s John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, Virginia Lee, PhD, and Gerard Schellenberg, PhD,will study rare neurodegenerative disorders.
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April 15, 2014
Lauren Massimo, CRNP, a postdoctoral fellow at Penn's Frontotemporal Degeneration Center and H. Branch Coslett, MD, professor of Neurology, spoke with the Philadelphia Inquirer about emotional functioning in people with dementia-related frontal lobe damage or right-sided strokes.
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April 14, 2014
Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD
, professor of Psychiatry, who heads a committee of doctors studying whether caffeine use disorder should be categorized as a mental illness, said more research is needed in an interview airing on CBS television affiliates in New York and Philadelphia.
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April 11, 2014
In an interview with USA Today regarding the school stabbing in Murrysville, PA, Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, said, "In these kinds of situations, the psychological casualties usually outnumber the physical casualties." Coverage also appeared on CNN and in the Pittsburgh Tribune Review.
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April 8, 2014
Wade Berrettini, MD, PhD, professor of Psychiatry, talked to Popular Science about the link between affinity for Adderall and susceptibility to ADHD or schizophrenia.
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April 2, 2014
A new study in a mutant fruitfly called sleepless confirmed that the enzyme GABA transaminase, which is the target of some epilepsy drugs, contributes to sleep loss. The findings, published online in Molecular Psychiatry, were led by Amita Sehgal, PhD, head of the Chronobiology Program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine.
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April 2, 2014
Researchers at Penn Medicine’s Center for Studies of Addiction, including Anna Rose Childress, PhD, research professor of Psychiatry, and Kimberly Young, PhD, a NIH/NIDA Post-doctoral Fellow at Penn, have now found that a commonly used neurological medication has proven successful at blocking the brain's reward system triggers.
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March 28, 2014
John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, co-director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research and director of the Institute on Aging, spoke was interviewed in a Newsweek article about funding for Alzheimer's disease.
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March 24, 2014
Using a University of Pennsylvania-designed device to noninvasively and continuously monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in acute stroke patients, researchers from Penn Medicine, including John A. Detre, MD, and the Department of Physics & Astronomy in Penn Arts and Sciences are now learning how head of bed (HOB) positioning affects blood flow reaching the brain.
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March 18, 2014
For the last four years, two titans and respected leaders in their fields have met monthly for lunch to talk about their work, their lives, and the books they are reading. Philadelphia Inquirer reporter, Art Carey recently sat in on one of these monthly conversations with Aaron Beck, MD, professor of Psychiatry, and Martin Seligman, PhD, professor of Psychology, as they discussed the mind and how to help people lead lives that are happy.
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March 15, 2014
A Reading man had an unconventional operation to remove a brain tumor, in a surgery rarely performed anywhere else in the country, 6ABC reports. Due to the potential invasiveness of a standard procedure and location of the tumor, Reading doctors referred the patient to Pennsylvania Hospital where John Lee, MD and Jason Newman, MD are among a few doctors in the nation who use a 4 millimeter endoscope with a 3-D camera to remove the tumor through the patient's nose.
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March 13, 2014
A new Penn Medicine study in JAMA Psychiatry, led by Caryn Lerman, PhD, director of the Brain and Behavior Change Program, and colleagues, is shedding light on brain connectivity in smokers that may help explain today’s high relapse rates, reports WHYY Radio.
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March 13, 2014
A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, including principal investigator Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, MSc, David F. Dinges, PhD, and Ruben Gur, PhD, will take part in a first-of-its-kind investigation by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) into the molecular, physiological and psychological effects of spaceflight on the human body by comparing identical twins.
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March 13, 2014
Roderic G. Eckenhoff, MD, professor and vice-chair of research, Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, commented in a Medscape Medical News article about new research suggesting that anesthesia and surgery significantly increase the risk for dementia.
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March 11, 2014
Penn Medicine researchers, including Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery, are using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in traumatic brain injuries.
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March 4, 2014
Marcos Frank, PhD, associate professor of Neuroscience, commented in a HealthDay News article, which reported on preliminary new research suggesting that the brains of insomniacs buzz with more activity during the day, offering possible insight into why people with sleep problems complain that their minds won't shut down at night.
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March 4, 2014
A Philly.com blog post looks at high rates of sexual assault among teen girls and offers some insight on how to help girls who may suffer with PTSD as a result. The blog post cites research by Edna Foa, PhD, professor of clinical psychology in the department of Psychiatry, and colleagues from the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety showing that prolonged exposure (PE) therapy can be a highly effective therapy in teen girls.
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February 27, 2014
H. Branch Coslett, MD, professor in Neurology, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer story covering a College of Physicians event discussing brain injuries sustained playing football. Coslett spoke at length about Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and what we’ve learned about the condition since it became widely associated with retired football players.
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February 21, 2014
Claude Nguyen, MD, assistant professor of Neurology, and colleagues created an app they say could enable doctors to provide more effective care for patients who have suffered acute stroke, Medical News Today reports.
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February 21, 2014
A Penn study in fruitflies, led by Nirinjini Naidoo, PhD, associate professor in the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology and the Division of Sleep Medicine and postdoctoral fellow Marishka Brown, PhD, strengthens the connection among protein misfolding, sleep loss, and age.
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February 21, 2014
Trevor Hadley, PhD of Penn’s Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research and Jay Amsterdam, MD, director of the Depression Research Unit, talked to the Daily Pennsylvanian in an article about the many ways that Penn approaches mental health issues.
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February 14, 2014
In a Proto Magazine article profiling tau, a floppy, free-form protein, sometimes called "the holy grail of dementia", John Trojanowski, MD, PhD and Virginia Lee, PhD, both professors of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, are credited as being pioneers of studying this protein.
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February 14, 2014
WHYY Newsworks reported on a study led by Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, on a newly discovered sleep mutant called redeye in fruitflies that appears to be directly controlled by the homeostatic drive to sleep.
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February 14, 2014
People receiving mental health care are up to four times more likely to be infected with HIV than the general population, according to a new Penn Medicine study published in the American Journal of Public Health led by Michael Blank, PhD, co-director of the Penn Mental Health AIDS Research Center. The study was also covered by Medical Daily, PsychCentral, WHYY, the Examiner, and dailyRx.
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February 13, 2014
According to findings published in JAMA Psychiatry, Penn Medicine researchers, including Ruben Gur, PhD, director of the Brain Behavior Laboratory and professor of Neuropsychology, have developed a better way to assess and diagnose psychosis in young children.
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February 10, 2014
Michael E. Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry, was quoted in a Medscape Medical News article about the complex polypharmacy many individuals with bipolar disorder receive.
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February 6, 2014
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News covers a study by Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, on a newly discovered sleep mutant called redeye in fruitflies that appears to be directly controlled by the homeostatic drive to sleep.
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February 5, 2014
ALS Today reports on a new study, by a US-German team including John Trojanowski, MD, PhD and Virginia Lee, PhD, MBA, looking at progression of various neurodegenerative diseases which reports that ALS may travel through key regions of the brain using the axons that connect them.
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February 5, 2014
Mahendra Bhati, MD, assistant professor of Clinical Psychiatry, talks to 6ABC about Seasonal Affective Disorder and how to prevent or lessen the blues.
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February 4, 2014
In light of a new study suggesting that newer football helmets could cut concussion risk in half, NBCNews.com interviewed Center for Brain Injury and Repair director Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery.
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January 31, 2014
John Trojanowski, MD, PhD was quoted in an AlzForum report on research regarding the mapping of TDP-43 routes in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.
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January 15, 2014
Daniel Wolf, MD, PhD, assistant professor of the Department of Psychiatry, commented to HealthDay about a study suggesting that teen brains showed more activity in a specific pleasure center of the brain compared to adults when they were rewarded during gambling games where money was at stake.
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January 10, 2014
Anthony Rostain, MD, professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, commented in a NBC News article about the discovery of a rare genetic mutation that disrupts the production of histamine, which may help researchers unravel the mystery that surrounds Tourette syndrome.
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January 7, 2014
Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery and director of the Penn Center for Brain Injury and Repair, comments in a Today.com story discussing a new study finding that nearly 50 percent of kids and young adults who didn’t reduce their mental strain following a concussion took 100 days or more to fully recover.
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January 7, 2014
The Scranton Times-Tribune features a letter to the editor by John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, director of Penn's NIH-funded Alzheimer's Disease Core Center, highlighting the need for a coordinated approach from the US to join in the global effort to end Alzheimer's by 2025.
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January 6, 2014
Among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, female, black, and Asian patients are substantially less likely to receive proven deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to improve tremors and motor symptoms, according to a new report led by Allison Willis, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, who identified considerable disparities among Medicare recipients receiving DBS for Parkinson's disease.
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January 2, 2014
Teen girls struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from sexual abuse do well when treated with a type of therapy that asks them to repeatedly confront their traumatic memories, according to a new Penn Medicine study led by Edna Foa, PhD, professor of clinical psychology in the department of Psychiatry.
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January 2, 2014
Neuropathologist John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, co-director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at Penn was quoted in a New York Times report regarding the validity of new assessments for C.T.E., or chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
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January 2, 2014
A Philadelphia Inquirer article referenced the neuroengineering research work involving bioinformatics performed in the lab of Brian Litt, MD, professor of Neurology and Bioengineering.
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