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To encode a random shRNA requires a random DNA sequence – of 29 nucleotides in this case – and its reverse complement in the same DNA strand, separated by a non-complementary loop sequence. A library of such sequences can be used in pooled, cell-based screens for small RNA therapeutics, biological tools, and/or biological probes.

Credit: Robert Wilson, PhD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

To encode a random shRNA requires a random DNA sequence – of 29 nucleotides in this case – and its reverse complement in the same DNA strand, separated by a non-complementary loop sequence. A library of such sequences can be used in pooled, cell-based screens for small RNA therapeutics, biological tools, and/or biological probes. (Robert Wilson, PhD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine)
 


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