News Release
 

June 28, 2011

CONTACT: Holly Auer
O: 215-349-5659
C: 215-200-2313


holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu

Penn Medicine - University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and University of Pennsylvania Health System


This release is available online at
http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2011/06/cardiac-arrest/

200,000 Patients Treated for Cardiac Arrest Annually in U.S. Hospitals, Penn Study Shows

First Analysis of National In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Rate Underscores Need to Identify Preventable Causes, Implement Best Practices in Resuscitation Care

PHILADELPHIA — More than 200,000 people are treated for cardiac arrest in United States hospitals each year, a rate that may be on the rise. The findings are reported online this week in Critical Care Medicine in a University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine-led study.

Though cardiac arrest is known to be a chief contributor to in-hospital deaths, no uniform reporting requirements exist across the nation, leaving experts previously unable to calculate its true incidence and study trends in cardiac arrest mortality and best practices in resuscitation care.

The authors, led by Raina M. Merchant, MD, MS, an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine, used three different approaches — involving the American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines data, a voluntary registry of hospital resuscitation events to estimate the total number of treated cardiac arrests that take place in United States hospitals each year.

While some of these events occur among terminally ill patients, the authors suggest that many of the cardiac arrests they catalogued may be preventable through better monitoring of patients, quicker response time to administer CPR and defibrillation, and improved adherence to best practices in resuscitation guidelines. Patients who suffer in-hospital cardiac arrests are more than twice as likely to survive than those who arrest in public settings -- 21 percent survive to go home, compared to less than 10 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients — but both areas suggest opportunities to improve and standardize care.

"Our study proves that cardiac arrest represents a tremendous problem for hospitals in the United States," Merchant says. "Until now, we could only guess about how many patients were suffering these events. It's impossible to make improvements in something we can't measure. These numbers finally provide us with a roadmap for improving allocation of resources to care for these critically ill patients and further our study of ways to identify patients who are at risk of cardiac arrest in the hospital and improve survival."

###

Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.3 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 17 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2013 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; Chester County Hospital; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Chestnut Hill Hospital and Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2013, Penn Medicine provided $814 million to benefit our community.