Penn Surgery In the News . . .

(February 13, 2020) People featured the story of Penn patient Jennifer Gobrecht, who gave birth to a baby boy after a successful uterus transplant — an event the magazine calls a “pioneering journey.” The co-principal investigators of the trial were Kathleen O’Neill, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Paige Porrett, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Transplant Surgery. (link)

(January 28, 2020) Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, wrote a piece for the Philadelphia Inquirer about making mistakes and cognitive bias. “We are constantly looking for alternate narratives that support our own opinions or conclusions, and help us feel good about our decisions,” Han shared. “While this tendency helps preserve our self-esteem, it also makes us vulnerable to what’s known as a cognitive bias.” (link)

(January 27, 2020) New research led by Sunil Singhal, MD, an associate professor of Surgery and director of the Center for Precision Surgery in the Abramson Cancer Center, shows using a compound that makes cancer cells glow during surgery can help surgeons spot otherwise hidden tumors inside a patient’s body. (link)

(January 27, 2020) A gene therapy being developed at Penn Medicine to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) successfully and safely stopped the severe muscle deterioration associated with the rare, genetic disease in both small and large animal models, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in Nature Medicine. Hansell H. Stedman, MD, an associate professor of Surgery and the study’s senior author, said the findings may refocus the field toward the use of a functionally optimized, safe utrophin-based gene therapy approach as the pathway to a potential cure for DMD. (link)

(January 22, 2020) Certain advanced cardiovascular therapies are much more commonly used in New York State than in the Canadian province of Ontario, raising questions as to what level of use is appropriate, a new study showed. Nimesh D. Desai, MD, PhD, director of Thoracic Aortic Surgery Research Program, who was not involved in the research, was quoted. (link)

(January 9, 2020) A team from Penn Medicine announced the birth of Benjamin Thomas Gobrecht, the first baby born as part of its ongoing Uterus Transplantation for Uterine Factor Infertility (UNTIL) trial. Ben is only the second baby in the nation to be born following transplantation of a uterus from a deceased donor. Penn’s uterus transplant trial is currently the only one in the United States that is actively enrolling patients. Co-principal investigators Kathleen O’Neill, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Paige Porrett, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Transplant Surgery, as well as trial participant, Jennifer Gobrecht, and her husband Drew, were quoted. (link)

(January 8, 2020) For the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, wrote about going above and beyond for patients. He shared how his chief resident organized a complex, high-risk operation overnight. “Our roles and responsibilities are ultimately of our own making. The only thing that is set in stone is the goal: excellent patient care. What people expect of you is typically the convention, the standard of care. But we can do much more than that,” Han noted. (link)

(January 2, 2020) Grace J. Wang, MD, an associate professor of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, commented on the increasing use of TransCarotid Artery Revascularization, a minimally invasive procedure used in the treatment of patients with carotid stenosis — narrowing of the carotid arteries — who are at a high risk for stroke. (link)

(December 13, 2019)U.S. News & World Report examined why some people gain weight on a plant-based diet. “Any intervention that doesn’t focus on reducing calories won’t lead to weight loss,” said Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager. “Just eating fruits and vegetables and increasing healthy fat intake hasn’t consistently shown that it leads to weight loss over time.” Tewksbury recommended following the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s My Plate approach to avoid oversized portions. (link)

(December 12, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, commented on dietary factors that can cause diarrhea. (link)

(December 9, 2019) Research suggests bariatric surgery is safe for teenagers with morbid obesity who would otherwise face a heightened risk of developing severe health problems, including heart disease and stroke. “As surgeons, we definitely don’t see surgery as a solution to the obesity epidemic; we see it as an option for patients or individuals that don't have any other medical options,” said Kristoffel R. Dumon, MD, an associate professor of Surgery. (link)

(November 25, 2019) South Jersey Magazine named Ari D. Brooks, MD, a professor of Surgery and director of the Integrated Breast Center at Pennsylvania Hospital, to its list of “2019 Men of the Year.” The Cherry Hill resident was recognized for his dedication to breast cancer screening and treatment. (link)

(November 15, 2019) Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular and often rapid heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other complications, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The research, which was presented at AHA 2019, is the among the first to demonstrate that height may be a causal risk factor for AFib. Michael Levin, MD, a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow at Penn, and Scott Damrauer, MD, an assistant professor of Surgery at Penn Medicine and a vascular surgeon at the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, led the study. (link)

(November 13, 2019) Jon Dorenbos, former Philadelphia Eagles long snapper, discussed the heart problems that ended his NFL career and the life-saving surgery performed by Joseph Bavaria, MD, co-director of the Transcatheter Valve Program. Bavaria explained how an aortic aneurysm — an abnormal bulge that occurs in the wall of the major blood vessel that carries blood from your heart to your body — increases one’s risk for a ruptured aneurysm. (link)

(November 12, 2019) A gene therapy being developed at Penn Medicine to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) successfully and safely stopped the severe muscle deterioration associated with the rare, genetic disease in both small and large animal models, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in Nature Medicine. CBS3 interviewed Hansell H. Stedman, MD, the study’s senior author and an associate professor of Surgery. (link)

(November 8, 2019) New research suggests weight loss is easier for men than women. Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, who was not involved in the research, explained that men have better responses to treatment, but are less likely to seek it. (link)

(October 29, 2019) Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, penned a piece for the Philadelphia Inquirer about writing as a therapeutic exercises for his mental and physical well-being during his medical training. "Writing helps me keep a positive philosophy and a broad worldview so that I can return to work each day believing in a good world, a just world, and the positive impact that even young trainees can have," Han explained. (link)

(October 28, 2019) Weight loss surgery has traditionally been viewed as a procedure for adults with severe obesity who haven't been able to lose weight or keep it off. New research, led by Robert A. Swendiman, MD, MSCE, a sixth-year general surgery resident, found that bariatric surgery is safe and, in many cases, beneficial for teenagers with morbid obesity who would otherwise face a heightened risk of severe health problems like heart disease and stroke. The findings were presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans. (link)

(October 24, 2019) Throughout October, Penn Medicine physicians, patients, and advocates are contributing to breast cancer awareness month with a series of op-eds for the Philadelphia Inquirer. In the fourth and final piece, Paris Butler, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, and Olatomide Familusi, MD, a resident in Plastic Surgery, address disparities in breast reconstruction after mastectomy and explain what patients need to know. (link)

(October 7, 2019) A gene therapy being developed at Penn Medicine to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) successfully and safely stopped the severe muscle deterioration associated with the rare, genetic disease in both small and large animal models, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in Nature Medicine. The study’s senior author Hansell H. Stedman, MD, an associate professor of Surgery, says the findings may refocus the field toward the use of a functionally optimized, safe utrophin-based gene therapy approach as the pathway to a potential cure for DMD. (link)

(September 24, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, LDN, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, is quoted in a SELF article on the side effects of protein bars and fiber bars. “A lot of these bars with a health angle can have ingredients that can cause people GI distress,” she said. (link)

(September 19, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, is quoted in a Popular Science article on intermittent fasting. Tewksbury noted that some people, like athletes who do high levels of physical activity, should be more cautious with intermittent fasting. It’s also not recommended for adolescents or people over age 65. (link)

(September 19, 2019) Writing for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, shared an experience with a patient which taught him a lesson about perseverance. “Each time we hold onto our values in less-than-gratifying circumstances, we have made an impact,” Han wrote. “Choosing to remain compassionate rather than isolated, faithful rather than cynical — these are choices that make an impact.” (link)

(September 12, 2019) SELF published a story that examines whether veggie chips are actually healthier than regular potato chips. Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, LDN, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, says there really aren’t any meaningful nutritional benefits to veggie chips over potato chips. “Depending on the brand you’re looking at, they usually have comparable fat, calorie, carb, and fiber content,” she said. (link)

(September 12, 2019) Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, shares a memorable patient experience from the cardiac surgery ICU. “Despite her suffering, she laughed loudly and often. She was the first person I checked on every morning and the last patient I said good night to each evening. She seemed always to be surrounded by members of her loving family, telling jokes and stories late into the night,” he recalls. (link)

(August 31, 2019) Reducing blood loss and achieving hemorrhage control are vital aspects of management for any emergency physician or trauma surgeon. There are also new and emerging approaches that may cut down on the need for blood/blood products in patients with significant blood loss. Based on the results of a new Penn study, use of a hormone — arginine vasopressin — reduced the need for blood/blood products by 50 percent in trauma patients with severe blood loss. Carrie A. Sims, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Surgery and Laboratory Director of the Penn Acute Research Collaboration, is quoted. (link)

(August 28, 2019) News outlets reported on a collaboration between Penn Medicine and the CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute that aims to accelerate high-priority clinical research efforts related to heart surgery. The seven-year initiative is funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. “Through this collaboration, we have a unique opportunity to share best practices in cardiac surgical research and help develop sustainable models that lead to improvements in patient access and outcomes,” said Michael Acker, MD, chief of Cardiovascular Surgery and primary grant investigator. (link)

(August 23, 2019) TODAY interviewed John P. Fischer, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, about the benefits of skin removal surgery after extreme weight loss as well as the barriers to getting insurers to cover the procedure. (link)

(August 5, 2019) The New York Daily News called on Sean Harbison, MD, a gastrointestinal surgeon from the Penn Hernia Center, to elaborate on the injury experienced by the Yankee first baseman, Luke Voit. Harbison said a sports hernia, which Voit was diagnosed with last week, takes substantial time to heal and may require surgery. (link)

(July 18, 2019) Surgery is a common treatment for individuals with colorectal cancer. Joshua Bleier, MD, a colon and rectal surgeon and section chief of Colorectal Surgery at Pennsylvania Hospital, commented on surgery at different ages, cancer severity, the difference between tumors in the left colon and right colon, and chemotherapy before surgery. (link)

(July 15, 2019) Joseph Bavaria, MD, co-director of the Transcatheter Valve Program, was quoted in an article on the emergence of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as the preferred treatment for aortic stenosis in most patients. Penn Medicine performs between 400 and 500 TAVR procedures each year. (link)

(July 12, 2019) While Americans have been turning to fiber supplements for decades to help them close the fiber gap and treat or prevent constipation, adding extra fiber to everyday snack products “is a newer trend in food manufacturing,” Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager tells SELF. (link)

(July 12, 2019) There are multiple benefits associated with movement after surgery, including improved recovery and a shorter hospital stay. Jason Han, MD, a resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, explains how the advice he gives to patients to keep moving inspires him as a resident. (link)

(July 5, 2019) A JAMA study by Penn researchers found an association between hormone therapy for prostate cancer patients and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Doctors may want to limit the treatment for certain patients, Ravishankar Jayadevappa, PhD, a research professor of Geriatrics and senior fellow in the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, told the Philadelphia Inquirer. Ravi Parikh, a fellow in Hematology-Oncology, and Thomas Guzzo, MD, MPH, chief of Urology, also commented. (link) (link)

(July 4, 2019) Requiring prospective bariatric surgery patients to lose weight before they can undergo the procedure may not be necessary or safe, according to a new study led by Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager. (link)

(June 27, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, discusses sugar intake. “It’s primarily about how much added sugar you’re having, how often, and what you are eating the rest of the time,” Tewksbury says. (link)

(June 26, 2019) Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, associate director of Cosmetic Surgery and an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, comments on the dangers of people buying fillers like Botox online and injecting them into their own faces at home. (link)

(June 22, 2019) Alan Wein, MD, a professor of Urology, explains why jitters can make us feel the need to use the restroom. With our nervous system in a heightened state, he says, our bodies’ response becomes more easily triggered. (link)

(June 22, 2019) Good Day Philadelphia anchor Lauren Johnson opens up about the hernia issues that forced her off the air earlier this year. The surgery to repair her hernia and get her back on her feet was performed by John P. Fischer, MD, MPH, FACS, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, who joined Johnson to discuss hernias and what patients need to know. (link)

(June 20, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, tells SELF how our body uses protein, and explains why we need it. “If we don’t get enough protein, our bodies actually won’t be able to rebuild properly and we will start to lose muscle mass,” Tewksbury said. (link)

(June 4, 2019) SELF explored why we need to eat fats and what happens in your body after eating fat. Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and bariatric program manager, described the digestion process and explains how our body can convert fat into energy. (link)

(June 3, 2019) Following a recent story examining the need for medical care related to female genital mutilation and the surgeons who perform reconstructions, the New York Times published a behind-the-scenes look at how the story came together. The original piece is centered around Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, and four of her patients. (link)

(May 31, 2019) A specialized pain management program for patients who underwent robotic surgery for urologic cancers resulted in just eight percent going home with narcotics after discharge, compared to 100 percent who would have received them without this enhanced recovery protocol. Ruchika Talwar, MD, a resident in Urology, and Thomas J. Guzzo, MD, MPH, chief of Urology, will present the findings at the ASCO Annual Meeting. (link) (link)

(May 24, 2019) In a front page story, the New York Times examines the need for medical care related to female genital mutilation and the surgeons who perform reconstructions. The story is centered around Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, and four of her patients. (link)

(May 14, 2019) Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions suggests LDL cholesterol — or “bad” cholesterol — may contribute to venous thromboembolism, which occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein and then travels through the bloodstream to the lungs. Scott M. Damrauer, MD, an assistant professor of Surgery, and one of the study’s lead authors, tells HealthDay News, “We don’t usually think of cholesterol as being important in venous disease, but our work on this study provides strong evidence that it may be predisposing people to venous thrombosis.” (link)

(May 14, 2019) Cary B. Aarons, MD, an associate professor of Clinical Surgery and director for the Penn General Surgery Residency Program, penned a piece about the importance of diversity in medicine and shares steps Penn took to improve the residency recruitment process. (link)

(May 9, 2019) WBRE-TV, an NBC affiliate in Northeast Pennsylvania, aired a feature on a patient who is seeking a liver transplant via the Penn Transplant Institute’s Living Liver Donor Transplant program. Kim Olthoff, MD, chief of Transplant Surgery, comments on the advantages of a receiving a liver transplant from a living donor. (link)

(April 30, 2019) AARP highlights innovative efforts to help expand the nation’s supply of organs available for transplantation. The feature references the clinical trials that Penn Medicine launched to determine the safety and efficacy of transplanting HCV-infected kidneys and hearts into patients who didn’t have the virus. Peter Abt, MD, an associate professor of Surgery, is quoted. (link)

(April 18, 2019) A new app developed by John P. Fischer, MD, MPH, FACS, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, can predict the likelihood that a patient will develop an incisional hernia following abdominal surgery, using big data to potentially help address a problem effects one out of every eight of these surgical patients. (link)

(March 27, 2019) The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed to update its national coverage policy for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a procedure for aortic stenosis. Joseph Bavaria, MD, co-director of the Transcatheter Valve Program, tells TCTMD that CMS did a good job navigating the complex interplay between access to care and the known relationship between volume and clinical outcomes. (link)

(March 18, 2019) The Philadelphia Inquirer reported on two studies presented at ACC2019 that showed transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is – at the very least – equivalent to surgery in the treatment of low-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Wilson Szeto, MD, chief of Cardiovascular Surgery at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, is a co-author of the PARTNER 3 trial. He told the Philadelphia Inquirer a key to the good outcomes with TAVR is the teamwork between heart surgeons and cardiologists. (link)

(March 6, 2019) Colleen Tewksbury, PhD, MPH, RD, a senior research investigator and Bariatric Program manager, discusses whether coffee is dehydrating. She explains to SELF that coffee’s hydrating properties can basically balance out its diuretic effects, which should stave off dehydration. (link)

(February 27, 2019) Teams where geriatricians work with surgeons and anesthesiologists to “co-manage” older patients are still unusual, but the trend is growing. Mark J. Simone, MD, an associate professor of Geriatric Medicine, Lisa Walke, MD, chief of Geriatric Medicine, and Carrie Sims, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Traumatology, Surgical Critical Care and Emergency Surgery, are quoted. (link)

(January 28, 2019) Joseph Bavaria, MD, co-director of the Transcatheter Valve Program, is quoted in a TCT MD story about a new study presented this weekend at the annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, which found a connection between transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) outcomes and hospital volumes for surgical aortic valve replacements (SAVR). Bavaria said the findings “are incredibly timely as there is an intense debate on this subject culminating in a series of national policy actions governing the performance of TAVR.” (link)

(January 7, 2019) As Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg misses court arguments for the first time in her career, John Kucharczuk, MD, FACS, chief of Thoracic Surgery and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, talks with the Washington Post about her recent lung cancer surgery and what it may indicate about her overall prognosis. (link)

(January 2, 2019) Jason Han, MD, a second-year resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, shares his experiences learning and teaching in the operating room, noting, “No matter where you are in life, there is always someone else who can learn and grow from what you have already accomplished. We all share a tremendous capacity to influence others, even if we don’t yet appreciate it.” (link)

(January 2, 2019) The Philadelphia Inquirer featured research for treating type 1 diabetes with pancreatic islet cell transplantation, which has resulted in some patients no longer needing insulin to manage their disease. Ali Naji, MD, PhD, director of the Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation Program, and Michael Rickels, MD, medical director of the program, are quoted. (link)

December 21, 2018) John Kucharczuk, MD, FACS, chief of Thoracic Surgery and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, talks with the Washington Post about the recent lung cancer surgery of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (link)

(December 11, 2018) Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery and associate director of Cosmetic Surgery, discusses what Philadelphia cosmetic patients want from their treatments and how this compares to cosmetic priorities in other regions. (link)

(December 7, 2018) Earlier this year, Mike Poeng, 50, was brought to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PPMC) after being shot in the groin by a gunman carrying an AK-47 rifle. Poeng, who was in a coma for weeks after the shooting, now has limited mobility in his right leg and can’t walk on his own. Mark Hoofnagle, MD, a trauma fellow at PPMC at the time, and Samir Mehta, MD, chief of Orthopedic Trauma, comment on Poeng’s injuries. (link)

(December 6, 2018) A team of Penn surgeons, led by Suhail Kanchwala, MD, an associate professor of Plastic Surgery, and Ian Soriano, MD, FACS, a clinical assistant professor of Surgery, are the first in the world to use a surgical robot to assist with a bilateral free flap breast reconstruction – a procedure in which tissue is taken from the lower abdomen and used to rebuild the breast. The robot allows surgeons to make a much smaller incision, allowing patients to recover and be discharged more quickly and without the use of addictive narcotic painkillers. (link)

(December 4, 2018) Medical professionals are speaking out in response to the National Rifle Association admonishing doctors advocating for tighter gun restrictions to “stay in their lane.” Jason Han, MD, a second-year resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery, and Jessica Weaver, MD, PhD, a Surgical Critical-Care fellow, share two memorable encounters.” (link)

(November 19, 2018) Philadelphia police give NBC10 an inside look at how the practice of “scoop and runs” – where police rush gunshot and stab wound victims to the nearest trauma center instead of waiting for an ambulance – is saving lives. “I’m very positive about the scoop and run practice here in Philadelphia. I think it gets patients quickly to the definitive treatment they need,” said Jeremy Cannon, MC, medical director of the Trauma Program. (link)

Fox 29 logo(November 16, 2018) Jeremy Cannon, MD, medical director of the Trauma Program, joined FOX29’s “Good Day Philadelphia” live to demonstrate lifesaving bleeding control techniques. The techniques, including proper wound packing and tourniquet application, are being taught to high school students as part of the national Stop the Bleed campaign. (link)

(November 14, 2018) Among cities with the highest rates of homicide, Philadelphia is the only one where police routinely rush gunshot and stab wound victims to the nearest trauma center instead of waiting for an ambulance. The practice – known as “scoop and run” or “scoop and go” – is entrenched among the city’s law enforcement officers. Dan Holena, MD, an associate professor of Trauma Surgery, discusses why Philadelphia is uniquely positioned to make this model of care work.” (link)

(November 9, 2018) Medical professionals are speaking out about what it’s like to treat victims of gun violence in response to a tweet by the National Rifle Association that admonished doctors who were advocating for tighter gun restrictions to “stay in their lane.” Adam Shiroff, MD, FACS, director of the Penn Center for Chest Trauma, told Buzzfeed, “It’s devastating to the health care team and we do it every single day.” Jeremy Cannon, MD, medical director of the Trauma Program, shared with NBC10 that if he “never had to talk to another mother, father, of family about their son or daughter whose just been killed by a firearm, I would celebrate.” (link)

(November 7, 2018) Research from Giorgos C. Karakousis, MD, an associate professor of Surgery, evaluated which melanoma patients may be able to avoid sentinel lymph node biopsy based on age and tumor thickness.” (link)

(November 2, 2018) For the sixth straight year – and 14th time overall – Penn Medicine is the recipient of a Health Care’s Most Wired Award, which recognizes hospitals and health systems that embrace and maximize technology to support the delivery of care. C. William Hanson III, MD, vice president and chief medical information officer at Penn Medicine, accepted the award. (link)

6ABC logo(October 12, 2018) 6ABC covered Masterman High School student Yuva Gambhir and his work this past summer in the lab of Hansell Stedman, MD, an associate professor of Surgery. Gambhir studied the biology of his own condition, Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (link)

(September 19, 2018) Some causes of bloody urine are more serious than others. Thomas J. Guzzo, MD, MPH, chief of Urology, explains some of the causes. (link)

(September 19, 2018) The Philadelphia Inquirer profiled Masterman High School student Yuva Gambhir and his work this past summer in the lab of Hansell Stedman, MD, an associate professor of Surgery. Gambhir studied the biology of his own condition, Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Leon Morales, a PhD student in the Stedman lab, is also featured. (link)

Philadelphia Inquirer(August 14, 2018) Ariana L. Smith, MD, an associate professor of Urology, and Diane Newman, DNP, a nurse practitioner who co-directs Penn’s Center for Continence and Pelvic Health, share insights on treatment options for incontinence. (link)

(July 19, 2018) The Melanoma Research Foundation honored Ari D. Brooks, MD, a professor of Surgery, director of Endocrine and Oncologic Surgery, and director of the Integrated Breast Center at Pennsylvania Hospital, with its 2018 Humanitarian Award. Suzanne McGettigan, CRNP, a nurse practitioner in the Abramson Cancer Center, received the Compassionate Care Award. (link)

(June 10, 2018) Joseph Bavaria, MD, co-director of the Transcatheter Valve Program, is quoted throughout a Washington Post story about the future of value replacement surgery and the movement toward transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as a go-to for most patients. “In the future – I can’t tell you when, but at some time – most aortic valve procedures will be done through a transcatheter approach,” Bavaria said. (link)

(May 11, 2018) Research from Cimarron Sharon, MD, a recent graduate of the Perelman School of Medicine, and Giorgos Karakousis, MD, an associate professor of Endocrine and Oncologic Surgery, shows married people tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages of melanoma than patients who are unmarried, widowed, or divorced. (link)

(April 19, 2018) New research from Cimarron Sharon, a fourth-year medical student, and Giorgos Karakousis, MD, an associate professor of Endocrine & Oncologic Surgery, shows married people tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages of melanoma than patients who are unmarried, widowed, or divorced. (link)

(March 4, 2018) In an article from the New York Times, five trauma surgeons including Jeremy Cannon, MD, an associate professor of Trauma, share what it’s like trying to repair the devastating injuries caused by military-style weapons. “The tissue destruction is almost unimaginable. Bones are exploded, soft tissue is absolutely destroyed. The injuries to the chest or abdomen — it’s like a bomb went off,” Cannon said.

(January 30, 2018) The Philadelphia Inquirer spoke with Pavan Atluri, MD, director of the Cardiac Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support Program, about a local musician – who created the music for ESPN’s “NFL Matchup” and Showtime’s “Inside the NFL” – who underwent a relatively rare procedure for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a thickening of the heart’s muscles) at the Mayo Clinic. Atluri is working with the surgeon who pioneered the procedure in the United States to start performing it at Penn.

6ABC logo(December 4, 2017) After the announcement of the country’s first live birth following a uterus transplant at Baylor University Medical Center, 6ABC sat down with Kate O’Neill, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Paige Porrett, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Transplant Surgery – co-principal investigators on Penn’s Uterine Transplantation for Uterine Factor Infertility (UNTIL) trial – to discuss this milestone, the impact on the field, and the recent launch of the UNTIL trial. (link)

(November 30, 2017) The Associated Press reports that the U.S. military’s special operations fighters being sent to war zones now carry freeze-dried blood plasma, a crucial addition to first-aid kits that can prevent badly wounded troops from bleeding to death on the battlefield. Jeremy Cannon, MD, SM, FACS, an associate professor of Trauma, is quoted on how the granulated plasma could help in civilian emergencies. (link)

(November 1, 2017) The University City Review profiles the Penn Trauma Program’s ‘Stop the Bleed’ campaign, which aims to bring public training sessions to University City and West Philadelphia that teach bystanders to save lives by managing uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency. Jeremy Cannon, MD, an associate professor of surgery in Traumatology, is quoted. (link)

6ABC logo(October 30, 2017) 6ABC reports on a pilot program spearheaded by a team of Penn medical professionals that aims to teach high school students from West Philadelphia what to do if they see someone experiencing traumatic bleeding. Jeremy W. Cannon, MD, SM, FACS, an associate professor of surgery in the division of Traumatology, is quoted. (link)

(October 20, 2017) Puneet Masson, MD, director of Male Reproductive Medicine and Surgery and an assistant professor of Urology, comments on a reported long-term decline in human sperm counts. (link)

(October 23, 2017) In the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting earlier this month, Rolling Stone examines the long-term psychological and physical issues that often plague survivors and witnesses. Jeremy Cannon, MD, SM, FACS, an associate professor of Surgery in Traumatology, and Steven Berkowitz, MD, an associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry and director of the Center for Youth and Family Traumatic Stress Recovery, are quoted. (link)

(October 16, 2017) Joseph M. Serletti, MD, chief of Plastic Surgery, and Penn patient Barbara Scudder talk about the upcoming Breast Reconstruction Awareness (BRA) Day, which will be held on Wednesday, October 18, at Penn to highlight the importance of educating women about their options after breast cancer surgery. (link)

(October 12, 2017) Former Philadelphia Eagles player, Jon Dorenbos, took to Instagram to thank his Penn Medicine care team – the staff on Silverstein 10, and Joseph Bavaria, MD, vice chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, who performed the surgery – after he was diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm in New Orleans and treated at HUP last month. (link)

6ABC News logo(October 12, 2017) 6ABC explores the choices women face for reconstruction after mastectomies through the eyes of patient Mary Depoe and Joseph M. Serletti, MD, chief of Plastic Surgery. The story also previews Breast Reconstruction Awareness (BRA) Day, which will be held next Wednesday, October 18, at Penn. (link)

(October 9, 2017) The Delaware News Journal profiles Mandy Sauler, a micropigmentation specialist and founder of the Sauler Institute of Tattooing on the campus of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and highlights the nipple tattooing work she does for breast reconstruction patients. Liza C. Wu, MD, FACS, an associate professor of Plastic Surgery, is also quoted. (link)

(October 2, 2017) In the aftermath of the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas, Jeremy Cannon, MD, SM, FACS, an associate professor of Surgery in Traumatology, and Patrick Kim, MD, trauma program director, appeared in multiple news outlets discussing the importance of mass casualty preparedness and the injuries that can result from high-velocity rifles. Steven Berkowitz, MD, an associate professor of clinical Psychiatry and director of Penn’s Child and Adolescent Trauma Program, also discussed the physical and mental effects of mass casualty incidents and the best methods to discuss such tragedies with young children. (link)

(September 30, 2017) If you get the urge to pee when you’re nervous, you’re not alone. It’s thought that “under stress, the [central nervous] system is activated to operate at a higher level of sensitivity, meaning that it takes less to activate the reflex,” said Alan Wein, MD, a professor of Urology. (link)

(September 10, 2017) In early reports following the aortic aneurysm diagnosis of former Philadelphia Eagles player Jon Dorenbos, Nimesh Desai, MD, an associate professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, discusses the typical surgical treatment, recovery, and risks of an aortic aneurysm in a CBS3 segment. (link)

Philadelphia Inquirer logo(September 10, 2017) The Philadelphia Inquirer profiles a local woman and her family who have been affected by cancers caused by a mutation in the PALB2 gene, a gene that works to repair broken strands of DNA. Without PALB2, unrepaired DNA accumulates, potentially leading to uncontrolled growth and proliferation of abnormal cells and an increased risk of cancer. Julia Tchou, MD, PhD, co-director of the Rena Rowan Breast Center, and Angela Bradbury, MD, an assistant professor of Hematology/Oncology and Medical Ethics & Health Policy, are quoted. (link)

(August 22, 2017) Patrick Kim, MD, trauma program director, and Jose Pascual, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Surgery in Traumatology, spoke with local news outlets about the importance of disaster and mass casualty planning, and the injuries sustained by passengers involved in this week’s SEPTA train crash. (link)

(August 9, 2017) One of the most common symptoms of testicular cancer is a pain-free mass in the testicle, according to Joseph Harryhill, MD, a clinical associate professor of Urology. “It is important for men to realize that a tumor often does not cause any significant discomfort – thus the importance of regular testicular self examination,” Harryhill said. (link)

(June 19, 2017) TV stations across the nation, including KSAT and WFRV, ran a story about a study led by Ali Naji, MD, PhD, a professor of Surgery, and Prashanth Vallabhajosyula, MD, an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, which uncovered a new method of detecting organ transplant rejection earlier than standard methods, and requires only a blood test. (link)

(June 15, 2017) Jeremy W. Cannon, MD, an associate professor of Surgery in Traumatology, comments on how trauma surgeons treat and manage injuries such as gunshot wounds that often require multiple surgeries to stop bleeding and repair damage to internal organs. (link)

(May 5, 2017) A study from Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, shows the potential to use stem cells collected from human fat for anti-aging treatments. (link)

(April 28, 2017) Paris Butler, MD, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, hosted a community event in West Philadelphia to educate women about their options to restore breast beauty after cancer treatment. (link)

(April 27, 2017) A patient details his experience having a benign cyst removed by Alan Schuricht, MD, FACS, a clinical associate professor of Gastrointestinal Surgery. (link)

(April 17, 2017) A study from Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, associate director of Cosmetic Surgery and director of Basic Science Research in the division of Plastic Surgery, shows the potential to use stem cells collected from human fat for anti-aging treatments. (link)

(April 14, 2017) Paris Butler, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of Plastic Surgery, will be the featured speaker at an upcoming event promoting early attention to breast cancer symptoms and awareness of breast-reconstruction surgery, especially among minorities. (link)

(April 11, 2017) Thomas Guzzo, MD, chief of Urology, is quoted in an article about new prostate cancer screening recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that have men re-thinking when a prostate-specific antigen test is appropriate, and how best to act on test results. Neha Vapiwala, MD, an associate professor of Radiation Oncology, is quoted in a related CBS3 segment. (link)

(March 27, 2017) Robert Caleb Kovell, MD, an assistant professor of clinical Urology, explains some penile injuries and what causes them.

Time magazine logo(March 21, 2017) TIME highlights a new reconstructive procedure developed by Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Surgery and associate director of cosmetic surgery, to help women who have been victims of female genital mutilation. (link 1) (link 2)

People magazine logo(March 8, 2017) People magazine featured Andy Sealy, a Penn patient who threw a goodbye party for her breasts after getting diagnosed with breast cancer. Dalia Sataloff, MD, chair of Surgery at Pennsylvania Hospital, and Suhail Kanchwala, MD, an assistant professor of Surgery, performed her surgeries.

Philadelphia Inquirer(February 27, 2017) Following the death of actor Bill Paxton, who is said to have suffered a stroke following heart valve surgery, Michael A. Acker, MD, chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer story.

(February 17, 2017) A new study from Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, associate director of Cosmetic Surgery and director of Basic Science Research in the Division of Plastic Surgery, shows the potential to use stem cells collected from human fat for anti-aging treatments. (link)

(February 15, 2017) Kristoffel Dumon, MD, an associate professor of Gastrointestinal Surgery, is quoted in a Science News piece about a study which found that people who undergo gastric bypass surgery are more likely to experience a remission of their diabetes than patients who receive a gastric sleeve or intensive management of diet and exercise.